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AGENT ORANGE

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    Nguyen Thi Ly, 9, who suffers from Agent Orange disabilities, in her home in Ngu Hanh Son district of Da Nang.
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    Nguyen Thi Ly, 9, who suffers from Agent Orange poisoning, goes with her mother, Le Thi Thu, also contaminated by Agent Orange, to the Ngu Hanh Son General Hospital for her chest condition, in Ngu Hanh Son district of Da Nang.
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    Nguyen Thi Ly, 9, who suffers from Agent Orange disabilities, attends school in Ngu Hanh Son district of Da Nang. Her school, the Pham Hong Thai Primary School, is paid for by the Children of Vietnam charity, which is an American based organization dedicated to helping children in Vietnam with disabilities.
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    Vo Thi Nham, 44, the mother of two boys afflicted with Agent Orange, carries one of her sons through their house in the hamlet of Bo Ban #1, in the Hoa Vang district of Da Nang.
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    Nguyen Thi Ly, 9, who suffers from Agent Orange disabilities, with her mother in her home in Ngu Hanh Son district of Da Nang.
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    Vo Thi Nham, 44, the mother of two boys afflicted with Agent Orange relax in their hamlet of Bo Ban #1, in the Hoa Vang district of Da Nang. The boys both have cerebral palsy and other ailments that were genetically handed down to them from their grandfather, who was a soldier in the Vietnam War.
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    Tan Thi Thu Hien, 18, reflected in the mirror, is the sister of Tan Tri, 21, and Tan Hau, 10, who are both afflicted with Agent Orange and live in the hamlet of Bo Ban #1, in the Hoa Vang district of Da Nang. Tan is ashamed of her brothers and shy about having strangers and friends visit her at home.
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    Tan Tri, 21, and his brother Tan Hau, 10, both afflicted with Agent Orange relax at home in the hamlet of Bo Ban #1, in the Hoa Vang district of Da Nang. They spend most of their days just sitting idly on the floor, taken care of by their mother and father. There are few services available to them, so they can never hope to walk or get educated.
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    Tan Hau, 10, who is afflicted with Agent Orange, plays with a watch in his home in the Hoa Vang district of Da Nang.
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    Tan Thi Thu Hien, 18, sister of Tan Tri, 21, and Tan Hau, 10, helps her brothers learn to read and write. Both boys are afflicted with Agent Orange and live in the hamlet of Bo Ban #1, in the Hoa Vang district of Da Nang.
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    Tan Hau, 10, who suffers from Agent Orange, plays at home in the Hoa Vang district of Da Nang. Because there are few services available to sufferers of Agent Orange, instead of receiving an education, he mostly just sits idly at home, being care for by his mother and father.
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    Vo Thi Nham, the mother of Tan Tri, 21, and Tan Hau, 10, sits quietly in their home while Tri naps. Both boys are afflicted with Agent Orange and live in the hamlet of Bo Ban #1, in the Hoa Vang district of Da Nang.
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    Tan is ashamed of her brothers and shy about having strangers and friends visit her at home.
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    Vo Thi Nham, stands next to her son, Tan Tri, 21, who is afflicted with Agent Orange in their home in the Hoa Vang district of Da Nan. Nham has another son, Tan Hau, 10, also afflicted.
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    Vo Thi Nham takes her son, Tan Hau, 10, who is afflicted with Agent Orange to a rehab center 5 days a week in the hamlet of Bo Ban #1, in the Hoa Vang district of Da Nang.
Agent Orange

May 15, 2010, marked the 35th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War. However, another important anniversary is looming and likely to be overlooked. Nearly 40 years have passed since the end of “Operation Ranch Hand” and the use of defoliating chemicals such as Agent Orange. The legacy of dioxin, the main ingredient in these defoliants, still exists today for the people of Vietnam. While it is believed that this chemical agent has affected more than three million Vietnamese, what is certain is that today more than one hundred and fifty thousand Vietnamese are living with the resultant health impact. The symptoms range from diabetes and heart disease to offspring born with horrible deformities, learning disabilities, and physical and psychological problems.

An enormous amount of money, mostly from U.S. sources, is being poured into support services and research for people afflicted by Agent Orange in the Vietnamese city of Da Nang. Unfortunately, many of the children affected by dioxin poisoning have received little support. This project focuses on two families in the city of Da Nang, which is being used as a kind of laboratory to study the effects of Agent Orange. Through their testimonies and scenes of their daily lives, I hope to bring to people’s attention the need to expand support for the children with disabilities in Vietnam associated with Agent Orange exposure.

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