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    A view of Auschwitz is seen through a sign that reads "Arbeit Macht Frei," a German phrase that translates to, "labour makes you free," at the main gate of the camp. Less than a week after this photograph was taken, the sign was stolen, though it has since been recovered.
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    Young visitors photograph a guard booth at Auschwitz.
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    Visitors to Auschwitz pose for a picture in front of the infamous Wall of Death.
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    A group of young visitors is seen in one of the wooden barracks at the site of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp.
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    A visitor is seen in front of a glass case filled with hair that was recovered at Auschwitz-Birkenau. According to scientists, the hair contains Zyklon B, the chemical that was used to kill prisoners in gas chambers.
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    Visitors are seen in the basement of block 11. This building had several functions, but was used above all as the camp jail. Men and women prisoners who were suspected of, and under investigation for, involvement in camp resistance movements or attempts to escape were placed here.
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    Visitors are reflected in the glass of a case that displays the shoes of murdered prisoners.
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    Tourists' signatures are seen on the wall of the KL Auschwitz entrance.
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    Visitors are reflected in the window of a brick barrack at the Birkenau camp site.
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    Preservationists at the Auschwitz conservation lab work to restore a pot used in the kitchen of KL Auschwitz. Auschwitz conservation lab is one of most advanced in the world due to the fact there is a rare need elsewhere to work with 20th century artifacts that require extremely sophisticated technology.
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    Preservationists work to conserve a prisoner's health records at the Auschwitz conservation lab.
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    Preservationists work to conserve a prisoner's health records at the Auschwitz conservation lab.
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    Visitors are reflected in the glass of a display case containing prosthetic limbs that belonged to the camp's prisoners.
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    A visitor wears the flag of Israel in front of the ruins of a gas chamber and crematory in Birkenau.
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    A tourist photographs the main guardhouse and rail entrance to Birkenau, known as the "Death Gate." Here, trains from all over Nazi-occupied Europe brought prisoners to the gas chambers of the biggest killing center in the Nazi system.
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    The interior of one of the barracks in KL Auschwitz I, a block that is not open to visitors due to the building's poor condition.
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    The interior of one of the barracks in KL Auschwitz I, a block that is not open to visitors due to the building's poor condition.
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    Preservation efforts are seen at Auschwitz-Birkenau.
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    Employees of the museum cut down trees that might fall on the barracks in an effort to preserve the site.
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    The silhouettes of visitors are seen through the barbed wire fence on a foggy morning in Birkenau.
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    A bus full of visitors arrives at the site of Auschwitz-Birkenau.
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    Visitors are seen balancing on the railroad tracks leading into the camp. This rail track is considered to be one of the most significant symbols of this death camp.
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    Visitors enter the men's quarantine camp in Auschwitz-Birkenau.
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    A group of young visitors and their guide are seen in front of the main SS guardhouse and rail entrance to Birkenau, also known as the Death Gate.
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    Visitors peer out of the door of Block 4 at Auschwitz.
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    A visitor to Auschwitz poses for a picture between barbed wire fences that used to be electrified.
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    The winter landscape of Birkenau is seen from the main SS guardhouse over the gate to the camp.
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    Maria Stroinska, a KL Auschwitz survivor, visit Auschwitz-Birkenau.
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    The landscape of the Birkeanu site is seen through barbed wire. After the end of WWII people from destroyed villages located near the camp used the wood of the barracks to rebuild their houses.
Can Auschwitz be Saved?

The Polish government is calling on other countries to help support the newly-founded Auschwitz-Birkenau Foundation, which hopes to raise 120 million euros to maintain the site of the former Nazi death camp.

Liberated 65 years ago, the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp is one of Eastern Europe’s most visited locations and one of its most fragile historical sites. It presents an unmatched conservation challenge.

Auschwitz-Birkenau was one of the Nazis’ most notorious concentration camps. It operated from 1940 until 1945, when it was liberated by the Soviet Union’s Red Army. After World War II, it was estimated that more than a million people died at Auschwitz. Since 1947, the Polish government has maintained Auschwitz, which lies about 40 miles west of Krakow, as a museum and memorial. It is a UNESCO World Heritage site, a distinction usually reserved for places of culture and beauty.

The camp site and the state-run museum covers nearly two square kilometers and includes many buildings and ruins from when the camp was operational. The Auschwitz camp itself covers 50 acres. In addition, Birkenau, a satellite camp about two miles away, sprawls over more than 400 acres.

Public interest in the camp has never been higher. Visits have doubled this decade, from 492,500 in 2001 to more than one million in 2009. But Auschwitz—with its 155 buildings and hundreds of thousands of artifacts—is deteriorating.

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