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CUBA: CYNICAL REALISM

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    People wait for the bus in Havana, Cuba.
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    Government employees throw flowers into the ocean in honor of the anniversary of the death of Cuban revolutionary Camilo Cienfuegos along the Malecon in Havana.
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    Paintings of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Vladimir Lenin and Jose Marti are posted in Plaza de la Revolucion in preparation for an event marking the 50th anniversary of the landing of Granma and a belated celebration for Fidel Castro's 80th birthday in Havana. Although it was kept secret until the last minute, Castro was too sick to attend the parade in his honor.
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    Ballet students at the Pro Danza school in Mariano, Havana, Cuba.
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    Children play in front a mural in Havana.
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    Young Cuban boys fire pellet guns at a shooting range in Havana, Cuba.
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    A Cuban Revolutionary Armed Forces, FAR, soldier guards Soviet made mobile missile launchers the day before a parade marking the 50th anniversary of the landing of Granma and a celebration for Fidel Castro's 80th birthday in Havana. Castro's original birthday celebration was delayed for three and a half months due to poor health.
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    A teenage boy prepares to throw a freshly caught fish up on top of a wall along the Malecon in Havana.
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    Two women are seen in the streets of Old Havana.
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    People buy bread in a bakery in Havana.
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    A nurse pushes her son's bicycle as he walks along side her in Cienfuegos.
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    An elderly man smokes a cigar inside a garage in Old Havana.
Cuba: Cynical Realism

On January 1st, 1959, as Fidel Castro’s guerrilla movement advanced through Cuba, General Fulgencio Batista fled the island he had ruled over since 1952. Meager reforms introduced by Raul Castro since his brother departed the spotlight have yet to improve the lives of ordinary Cubans. In contrast with the privatized Chinese economic model, the Cuban economy is mostly state owned. As there is never quite enough food and wealth to go around, nearly all of the islanders have learned how to hustle and cheat the system. While many of those who lived through the revolution still largely believe in its ideals, younger generations tend to view the state ideology with skepticism. As the revolution grows ever older, millions of Cubans are quietly waiting for change.

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