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MYANMAR

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    Daw Aung San Suu Kyi's desk.
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    Women from the Pa'O ethnic group shop for fish and vegetables near Inle Lake, a freshwater lake in Shan State, Myanmar.
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    Passengers on a train in Yangon, Myanmar.
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    Workers ride in the back of a minibus traveling from the Yangon River ferry crossing into the Irrawaddy Delta.
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    Buddhist monks and onlookers watch a game of "takraw" outside the gates of Shwenandaw Kyaung Temple in Mandalay.
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    Two men walk toward the market near Inle Lake, Myanmar.
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    A young couple ride a motorcycle from Pyin Oo Lwin to Mandalay on the Burma Road.
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    A migrant Burmese dock worker is seen in Mae Sot, Thailand.
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    Two schoolgirls ride from school in Nyaungshwe on the banks of Inle Lake, Myanmar.
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    Buddhist monks ride a minibus around the Royal Palace to collect alms at dawn in Mandalay. There are so many monks in Mandalay that monks often have to travel unusually long distances to collect food from the townsfolk in the morning. Monks only eat food that is provided for them by the populace.
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    Three young men struggle to take a motorcycle down a jetty in the Irrawaddy River in Mandalay. The Irrawaddy is the principle trade route from northern Myanmar to the south.
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    Two young lovers kiss in the Theingotttara Park at the foot of Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon. Public displays of affection are frowned upon in Myanmar as in most Asian societies, so young people seek out hidden corners of parks where they can be discreet in a public place.
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    A film crew makes a B movie at the Candacraig Hotel in Pyin Oo Lwin. Myanmar has a popular but very low budget domestic film industry. Filmmakers from China and elsewhere in Asia come to Myanmar to make low budget films.
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    A group of farmers play soccer in Bagan, the ancient and spiritual capital of Myanmar.
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    A group of men watch television in a small restaurant in Taunggyi, the capital of Shan State.
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    A man works in a mung bean processing factory in Industrial Zone Number 5, Yangon.
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    An engineer stands with Burmese laborers during work on the gas and oil pipeline that carves its way from Kunming in China to the Indian Ocean on the coast of Myanmar. Built and designed by the China National Petroleum Corporation, CNPC, the pipeline will be over 1,700 miles long with a capacity to deliver 23 million tons of oil and 12 billion cubic meters of natural gas.
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    The gas and oil pipeline that carves its way from Kunming in China to the Indian Ocean on the coast of Myanmar.
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    Myawaddy, Myanmar.
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    Teak logs at a depot near the Taukkyan War Cemetery in Yangon. The importing of teak from Myanmar is banned in many countries but rapacious logging is endemic.
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    Teak logs at a depot near the Taukkyan War Cemetery in Yangon. Importing teak from Myanmar is banned in many countries but rapacious logging is endemic in the country.
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    Villagers displaced by the Yeywa Hydropower Dam, built by a consortium of Chinese, British and Swiss companies, scratch out a living in a new community. The village has no water supply near so villagers have to take an ox cart to the Myitnge River a mile away. There is no irrigation, no shade and many families from this ancient community refused to settle here, destroying a community that is hundreds of years old. The government installed electric pylons but the villagers are unable to afford the subscription.
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    A helicopter landing pad built for Gen. Than Shwe so he could land close to one of his favorite temples is seen near Inle Lake.
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    Local villagers visit a newly opened hotel on Inle Lake.
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    An Intha fisherman is seen on Inle lake, Myanmar. The Intha are members of a Tibeto-Burman ethnic group living on and around Inle Lake, who support themselves through fishing and tending floating vegetable farms. They are famous for their leg-rowing techniques that allow them to cast nets two-handed from small canoes.
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    A grandmother dotes on her grandchild, bathed in the early morning light, on the grounds of a monastery near the U Bein Bridge outside of Mandalay.
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    Road workers are seen in Industrial Zone 5, Yangon.
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    Porters wait at the docks in Yangon, Myanmar.
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    Ferryboatmen are seen on the banks of the Yangon River.
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    Dockworkers unload food off a truck and onto a river boat on the Yangon River.
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    Young women unload firewood from ferries on the Irrawaddy River in Mandalay.
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    Two young women carry baskets from the market on the ferry as they make their way across the Yangon River to the Irrawaddy Delta.
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    Porters work at the docks in Yangon.
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    Burmese migrant workers unload products from a Thai truck in a port in Mae Sot, Thailand from where they will be loaded onto a Burmese long tailed boat to be shipped across the Moei River to the Burmese town of Myawaddy. Mae Sot has been a smugglers gateway to Myanmar for decades. There are estimated to be 500,000 illegal Burmese workers in Thailand.
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    Men and women from the Pa'O and Inda ethnic groups bargain and shop for fish and vegetables at the market near Inle Lake, Shan State.
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    Villagers from around Inle Lake arrive at the Indein market in long tailed boats at dawn.
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    Burmese soldiers rest under a tree on the grounds of the Bagan temple complex while they guard a footpath during the visit of Gen. Than Shwe.
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    A portrait of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi.
Myanmar

Myanmar is a new chapter in Knight’s periodical study of Asia. Since 2010 he has been traveling in Myanmar as it faces the challenges of unprecedented transformation having emerged from over 60 years of civil war and decades of military rule.

With his friends of 25 years – photographers Philip Blenkinsop and Daniel Schwartz and writer Bertil Lintner – he published a 105-page portfolio in the Swiss magazine Du in November 2012 and created an exhibition at the 2SnakesStudio in Bangkok.

In response to the rapidly changing political and economic situation in Myanmar, Knight is currently developing an ethnographical, anthropological and topographical survey of the hill tribes in the border areas of Myanmar and its neighbors in collaboration with regional and international academics, historians, architects, journalists and institutions.

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