Skip to Content

Photographers

FRANCO PAGETTI

Based in Milan

Portfolio

  • alt-text-here
    Portrait of a protester in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Feb. 4, 2011. Hundreds of thousands of Egyptians gathered in Tahrir Square today, which marks the 11th day of the uprising, praying, chanting slogans, and waving flags in a chiefly peaceful demonstration for the expulsion of President Hosni Mubarak. In contrast to the last two days, there were few signs of the violent government supporters who anti-Mubarak protesters said were assembled by the Mubarak government.
  • alt-text-here
    Manigue Nimvuriki, 18, is transported by a Médecins Sans Frontières, MSF, land cruiser to the hospital in M'Pati, North Kivu province, Democratic Republic of the Congo, DRC, on Oct, 23, 2009. Nimvuriki, who was suffering from Peritonite, treated traditionally, died early in the morning.
  • alt-text-here
    Shukuro Chamce, 15, lies at home in Muhongozi, North Kivu province, Democratic Republic of the Congo, DRC, on Oct. 27, 2009. Chamce returned home after doctors at the Médecins Sans Frontières, MSF, medical clinic decided there was nothing they could for her. She is suffering from malaria, pneumonia, hemorrhages and HIV, a result of having been raped and abused by soldiers for four years. She was ten when she was kidnapped by rebels of the Forces Democratiques de Liberation du Rwanda, FDLR. Her mother found her in the village of Nyanzale where the soldiers left her.
  • alt-text-here
    Villagers return from the local market during a rain storm in Muheto, North Kivu province, Democratic Republic of the Congo, DRC, on Oct. 15, 2009. It usually takes hours to travel from one village to another suring bad weather conditions.
  • alt-text-here
  • alt-text-here
    Friends and relatives gather around the coffins of a man killed during clashes between Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi's forces and anti-government protesters at the Al-Hawary cemetery in Benghazi, Libya, Thursday, Feb. 25, 2011. More then 300 people have reportedly died during the demonstrations.
  • alt-text-here
    Rebel fighters take position in the desert near a local university, in Brega, Libya, Wednesday, March 2, 2011. Pro-Gaddafi fighters had taken over a local university as well as the oil installations and port on the western outskirts. Rebels, armed with AK-47 automatic rifles and rocket-propelled grenade launchers, tried to approach the pro-Gaddafi fighters but came under heavy fire, and fighter jets repeatedly bombed the advancing rebels. After several hours of intense gun exchanges, rebel reinforcements came in from Ejdabiya and Benghazi, arriving with heavier weapons, and eventually gained the upper hand, forcing pro-Gaddafi forces to abandon their positions, leaving Brega again in rebel hands.
  • alt-text-here
    Opposition troops are hit with artillery fire as they are pushed back east out of Bin Jawwad, toward Ras Lanuf, Libya, Sunday, March 6, 2011. Heavy fighting went on throughout the day between both sides, as Gaddafi's troops hit the opposition with air strikes, artillery, and sniper fire. The day before opposition troops took back Ras Lanuf from troops loyal to Muammar al-Gaddafi.
  • alt-text-here
    Libyan rebels on a top of trucks belonging to Moamer Kaddhafi's forces on the western entrance of Benghazi. Coalition strikes have succeeded in crippling the air defenses of Moamer Kadhafi's Libyan regime and a no-fly zone is effectively in place over the country, Benghazi Libya sunday 20, 2011
  • alt-text-here
    Jose Adames, 55, teacher, walks with his story written on a panel near the New York Stock Exchange in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York on Jan. 12, 2009. Adames was fired on Dec. 23, 2008 from Wesford Elementary School. President Barack Obama faces a number of challenges in the new presidential era, among them, a fragile economy, an increasing unemployment rate and crime.
  • alt-text-here
    Orthopedic center, Afghanistan, March 2003. Three woman with prosthetic devices are sitting on a bench outside the center with a child. The majority of patient amputees is victim of mines. The center is in operation in Kabul since 1988.
  • alt-text-here
    Soldiers patrol a camp for internally displaced persons, IDPs, at the Al Hijra refugee camp in the Shangani district of Mogadishu, Benadir region, Somalia on Nov. 13, 2008. Some of the residents in this camp have been living here since 1995. The past two years have seen the deadliest violence in Mogadishu since its inception nearly two decades ago, displacing a staggering 600,000 Somalis from February to November of 2007 alone. Over one million internally displaced persons, IDPs, in and around the capital are forced to live in over crowded camps, often without water or electricity, and are exposed to fatal diseases due to unsanitary conditions and malnutrition. Escalating violence has forced aid workers out, leaving the IDPs with little to no aid.
  • alt-text-here
    A woman walks along side the skeletal remnants of bullet-ridden buildings in the Shangani neighborhood of Mogadishu, Benadir region, Somalia on Nov. 13, 2008. Nearly two years after Ethiopian forces led an armed intervention to oust Somalia's Islamic Courts Union from power, the impoverished country has seen some of the deadliest violence in its history. A staggering 600,000 Somalis have fled the capital city from February to November of 2007 alone. Nearly half of the city is deserted with over one million internally displaced persons, IDPs, taking refuge in one of the hundreds of over crowded camps in and around the city.
  • alt-text-here
  • alt-text-here
    Soldiers of the Transitional Federal Government, TFG, patrol a controlled government area along the KM4 road in Mogadishu, Benadir region, Somalia on Nov. 12, 2008. Many of the soldiers, often unpaid and insufficiently trained, belong to differing militia groups, answering to their own leaders. The TFG is currently the internationally recognized government of Somalia, supported by Ethiopia, the U.S. and the U.N. Although having formed in 2004, it wasn't until two years later, when the opposing Islamic Court Union was overthrown, that they gained dominance in the country.
  • alt-text-here
    The Al Haier prison yard is visible in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on Jan. 13, 2008. The prison compound in Al Haier, a small town on the outskirts of Riyadh, is one of five maximum-security facilities in Saudi Arabia. This new prison facility, constructed with the needs of the “munasaha” Islamic rehabilitation program in mind, was recently completed, and prisoners are being transferred from the old prison into this newer one. Many of the prisoners here were convicted in domestic insurgent incidents and will be given the opportunity to partake in “munasaha” dialogues with Saudi clerics. These dialogues, intended to turn them away from militant views of Islam, are at first held in the prison, but near the completion of their sentences the prisoners will be transferred to a specially-designed rehabilitation center for two or more months of intensive psychiatric care and Koran classes.
  • alt-text-here
    Saudis walk past a destroyed building in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on Jan. 9, 2008. Mosques and poor areas of the city are where al Qaeda and other insurgent groups try to recruit members.
  • alt-text-here
    Smoke fills the air on the battle-charred streets of Tall Afar, Ninawa governorate, Iraq on Sept. 10, 2005. In 36 hours this week alone, three U.S. soldiers died in these streets, one of them a pilot whose reconnaissance helicopter was shot down like so many others before. In Iraq's north east corner close to the Syrian border, Tall Afar is a city under seige. Held and ruled like a fiefdom for months by al-Qaeda forces. U.S. and Iraqi soldiers pushed into the ancient Iraqi city near the Syrian border from the south, clearing a mostly Shiite area first on their march north through the streets to the stronghold district of Sarai.
  • alt-text-here
    During the massive U.S. attack on the al Qaeda stronghold of Tall Afar, soldiers of the 1st and 3rd U.S. Special Forces Groups, soldiers of the Blue Platoon, Grim Troop, Sabre Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, and Iraqi special forces of the 36th Commando Brigade and soldiers of the 2nd Iraqi Army Division search for insurgents in Tall Afar, Ninawa governorate, Iraq on Sept. 4, 2005. On days two and three of the attack, the soldiers cleared Shiite Turkoman civilians from their homes in the city's south. Their homes line what U.S. planners dubbed 'Route Corvette'. Soon, combat engulfed the forces' northern advance towards 'Route Barracuda', the gateway to the al Qaeda stronghold in the Sarai district, as insurgents engaged them with sniper fire and RPGs from rooftops and windows along the ancient winding laneways. Civilians not yet cleared were caught in the crossfire, rushing past the battling soldiers even as insurgents were taken prisoner in the midst of the fight.
  • alt-text-here
    On days two and three of the massive U.S. attack on the al Qaeda stronghold of Tall Afar, soldiers of the 1st and 3rd U.S. Special Forces Groups, soldiers of the Blue Platoon, Grim Troop, Sabre Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, and Iraqi special forces of the 36th Commando Brigade and soldiers of the 2nd Iraqi Army Division, clear Shiite Turkoman civilians from their homes in southern Tall Afar, Ninawa governorate, Iraq on Sept. 4, 2005. Their homes line what U.S. planners dubbed 'Route Corvette'. Soon, combat engulfed the forces' northern advance towards Route Barracuda, the gateway to the al-Qaeda stronghold in the Sarai district, as insurgents engaged them with sniper fire and RPGs from rooftops and windows along the ancient winding laneways. Civilians not yet cleared were caught in the crossfire, rushing past the battling soldiers even as insurgents were taken prisoner in the midst of the fight.
  • alt-text-here
    U.S. soldiers of Blue Platoon, Fox Troop, Sabre Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment seal off the northern Iraqi city, a stronghold for al-Qaeda's Iraq organisation akin to a small Fallujah, in Tall Afar, Ninawa governorate, Iraq on Aug. 26, 2005. The scene of bitter and vicious fighting over the past three months as the Cavalry Regiment has attempted to drive out the al-Qaeda forces, the city of 200,000 people was closed off and isolated in the last week of August in a bid to trap insurgents inside while a massive contingent of U.S. and Iraqi troops massed for an assault. Troops positioned their battle tanks and Bradley armored fighting vehicles at what they call Checkpoint 1 on the city's western artery as part of the element of shut the city down and control the flow of insurgents. For weeks locals, their vehicles loaded down with children, animals, televisions, bedding and furniture have fled for outlying villages to avoid al Qaeda fighters who seized control of the city and have ruled it for months and to escape the impending U.S. offensive.
  • alt-text-here
    fightersresidents of Bregia take position in the desert around the University compound how to prevent the attack of pro gheddafi troups that surrounded the university compound and the refinery keeping the position before the have been pushed aback by the resistence. the anti government forces lost 14 people. Bregia Libya, March 2, 2011
  • alt-text-here
  • alt-text-here
  • alt-text-here
    Power and satellite cables crowd the space between apartment complexes near Karada Jauwa, a traditional trade and market place in the Karada neighborhood of central Baghdad, Iraq on Oct. 16, 2008. With the violence in Iraq at a four year low, people venture out into the streets once again to engage in leisure activities and daiy life. Karada Jauwa is typically lined with little kebab stalls, bakeries, art galleries, cell phone shops and clothing stores. Apart from the numerous police checkpoints, Karada, which was one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in Baghdad just a few months ago with daily car bombs and mortar attacks, looks just like it did four years ago.
  • alt-text-here
    Resident of the marshlands wait along a street in Suq Ash Shuyukh, Dhi Qar province, Iraq on Oct. 27, 2008. The Iraqi Marshland is the largest wetland ecosystem in the Middle East. In the 1990's, Saddam Hussein had them drained, turning some areas to near desert. Many of the marsh Arabs have returned to live here once again, after fleeing the revolt of 1991, to a way of life that is incredibly hard; as one of the poorest areas in the country, basic amenities are still lacking. The people of al-Houta, who are from the Shaghamba tribe, have been engaged in a dispute with members of the nearby Garamsha tribe for more than a decade.
  • alt-text-here
    Families gather in a park in Baghdad, Iraq on Oct. 17, 2008. With the violence in Iraq at a four year low, people venture out into the streets once again to engage in leisure activities and daily life.
  • alt-text-here
    Soldiers from the Apache Troop, 6th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, relax between intensive house to house searches during a two day operation on the outskirts of Muqdadiyah, Diyala province, Iraq on Oct. 4, 2007. The area, approximately 90 kilometers north of Baghdad, is a known al Qaeda stronghold
  • alt-text-here
    A child walks past a bullet-ridden wall in the Nahr al-Bared camp for Palestinian refugees near Tripoli, North Governorate, Lebanon on Dec. 2, 2008. Nahr al-Bared is where the Lebanese Army battled an armed group called Fatah al Islam for almost four months, between May and early September 2007. An estimated 400 people died in the fighting, including Lebanese Army soldiers, Fatah al Islam fighters and civilians. A great part of the camp was reduced to rubble, and the vast majority of its 40,000 inhabitants had to flee to the adjacent Beddawi Palestinian camp or to other locations in Lebanon. They sheltered for months in often precarious conditions. For the eldest among these Palestinian refugees, it was their second or even third displacement. The camp is slowly being rebuilt, but as of late 2008, thousands of inhabitants have still not been able to return.
  • alt-text-here
    Women walk along rubble in Al Arasa, located on the outskirts of the know al Qaeda stronghold of Muqdadiyah, Diyala province, Iraq on Oct. 6, 2007. U.S. soldiers call Muqdadiyah 'little Falluja'. As escalating violence in Iraq continues, U.S. President George W. Bush sent thousands of additional troops to Iraq in 2007 in order to strengthen security. Countless searches were performed by the U.S.-led Coalition in al-Qaeda and insurgent strongholds as the conflict between Shia and Sunni Muslims continues.
  • alt-text-here
    A mother cries for her seriously ill daughter at the local hospital, which is now closed after insurgents had attacked it, in the al Qaeda stronghold of Muqdadiyah, Diyala province, Iraq on Oct. 3, 2007. As with many Iraqi families, the men have disappeared and she is unable to go to the main hospital in Baqubah.
  • alt-text-here
    A woman brings her child outside their home momentarily, as it is only safe when the U.S. military is present, in the al Doura district of Baghdad, Iraq on June 5, 2007. Life in al Doura has become worse since two Iraqi National Policemen, former members of the pro-Shiite Badr Brigades, had set up a check point outside the neighborhood and began shooting civilians, including women and children, because they were Sunni.
  • alt-text-here
  • alt-text-here
    Soldiers of the 1st Platoon, Bravo Company, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborn Division, from combat outpost, COP, Callahan, arrest a group of suspected Madhi Army members in the Shiite district of Shaab, Baghdad, Iraq on May 28, 2007. According to intelligence evidence, the men have been accused of kidnapping and killing a Sunni man. One of the men is a snipper who shot three U.S. soldiers from COP Callahan. The portrait is of Husayn ibn Ali, a revered Shiite Imam, who is the grandson of the prophet Muhammad and son of Ali.
  • alt-text-here
    Hussein Abdul Baqui Ismail, Sunni, stands for a portrait in the Adhamiyah neighborhood of Baghdad, Iraq on Jan. 22, 2007. Ismail is an engineering student at the Baghdad Polytechnic. However, the numerous checkpoints throughout Baghdad, patrolled by the Iraqi National Police, make it much too risky for him to attend his classes. Many Sunnis, revealed by their identification cards, are killed at these checkpoints. It's been six months since he's attended the university but he hopes that he will be able emigrate to Syria or Jordan to finish his courses, work and bring his family abroad. These individual portraits show the faces of those trapped in the middle of the civil war.
  • alt-text-here
    Ali Abdul Hussein, left, Mohammed Abdul Redha, center, and Ahmed Khalaf, right, Shiites loyal to Muqtada al Sadr, stand for a portrait in Baghdad, Iraq on March 2, 2006. They work in the local office of Muqtada Al Sadr who, after a Sunni mosque was attacked, helped to secure it. These individual portraits show the faces of those trapped in the middle of the civil war.
  • alt-text-here
    Skeletal remnants lay testament to the foregoing conflict in the Nahr al-Bared camp for Palestinian refugees near Tripoli, North Governorate, Lebanon on Dec. 2, 2008. Nahr al-Bared is where the Lebanese Army battled an armed group called Fatah al Islam for almost four months, between May and early September 2007. An estimated 400 people died in the fighting, including Lebanese Army soldiers, Fatah al Islam fighters and civilians. A great part of the camp was reduced to rubble, and the vast majority of its 40,000 inhabitants had to flee to the adjacent Beddawi Palestinian camp or to other locations in Lebanon. They sheltered for months in often precarious conditions. For the eldest among these Palestinian refugees, it was their second or even third displacement. The camp is slowly being rebuilt, but as of late 2008, thousands of inhabitants have still not been able to return.
  • alt-text-here
    Somalis shop at an open air market in the shadows of decaying buildings in the Hamar Weyne district, one of the most dangerous in the city, in Mogadishu, Benadir region, Somalia on Nov. 12, 2008. Nearly two years after Ethiopian forces led an armed intervention to oust Somalia's Islamic Courts Union from power, the impoverished country has seen some of the deadliest violence in its history. A staggering 600,000 Somalis have fled the capital city from February to November of 2007 alone. Nearly half of the city is deserted with over one million internally displaced persons, IDPs, taking refuge in one of the hundreds of over crowded camps in and around the city.
  • alt-text-here
  • alt-text-here
    People arrive at Valentino fashion show at Paris Haute Couture Fashion Week for Fall/Winter 2010-2011 in Paris, on July 7, 2010.
  • alt-text-here
    Shanghai , China May 15, 2010. Dior collection Cruise 2011 t the Bund , the Financial Square in Shanghai. Shanghai sits on the Yangtze River Delta on China's eastern coast. The city proper is bisected by the Huangpu River, a tributary of the Yangtze. The historic center of the city, the Puxi area, is located on the western side of the Huangpu, while a new financial district, Pudong, has developed on the eastern bank. Shanghai is often regarded as the center of finance and trade in mainland China.
  • alt-text-here
    L’Wren Scott and Lynn Yeager has seen shopping on 47th street, the famous diamond district in New York on May 5, 2010
  • alt-text-here
  • alt-text-here
    Portrait of a U.S. Marine of Lima Company, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force (I MEF) during an all-out military offensive against Iraqi insurgents in Fallujah, Al Anbar governorate, Iraq on Nov. 12, 2004. Located some 40 miles west of the Iraqi capital, Fallujah has been the epicenter of a resistance that has dogged U.S. and Iraqi forces for over a year. On the eve of November 8th, in an attempt to recapture the city, Operation Phantom Fury commenced and coalition troops pushed into the area from the west and south. Soon, combat engulfed the forces' advance, as insurgents engaged them with sniper fire and RPGs in one of the fiercest battles yet.
  • alt-text-here
    U.S. military surgeons treat a wounded soldier in the Emergency Room of Bagram's SSG Heath N. Craig Joint Theater Hospital at Bagram Air base, north of Kabul, Afghanistan on Jan. 14, 2010.
  • alt-text-here
    U.S. military nurses treat a wounded soldier in the Emergency Room of Bagram's SSG Heath N. Craig Joint Theater Hospital at Bagram Air base, north of Kabul, Afghanistan on Jan. 13, 2010.
  • alt-text-here
  • alt-text-here
    Aerial view of a village in the mountains, between Jalalabad and Kabul, in Afghanistan on Jan. 8, 2010. The area makes up a fraction of the Hindu Kush, a 500-mile mountain range spanning between north-western Pakistan and eastern and central Afghanistan. For centuries, its barren and jagged mountain ranges have been likened to a graveyard for invading armies. Extreme climatic conditions, sparse roads and impassible terrain make combat a grueling feat.
  • alt-text-here
    Patients exercise with callipers at the International Committee of the Red Cross, ICRC, ortophedic center in Kabul, Afghanistan on Jan. 27, 2010. Paraplegics disabled with spinal cord injuries are the most delicate cases.
  • alt-text-here
    A woman walks below barbed wire in Kabul, Afghanistan on Jan. 27, 2010. Due to the many assassination attempts, new fortified areas are appearing in front of embassies and ministry departments. This is the consequence of the increasing Taliban incursions to the heart of the city, a clear sign of the inefficiency of the Karzai government, divided by power wars and pandemic corruption.
  • alt-text-here
    Marian, 15, poses for a portrait in her house in Kabul, Afghanistan on Jan. 20, 2010. In two weeks she will be married in Gazni and her family will receive 2,000 USD from the husband's family. That money will ensure the survival of her family for the next two years at least. Her father was a Taliban before the fall of Mullah Omar's regime and was wounded, according to him, by a personnel landmine, becoming paraplegic and losing one leg a year ago.
  • alt-text-here
    An Afghan widow begs for bread in the old city of Kabul, Afghanistan on Jan. 19, 2010. Finding employment is almost impossible for Afghan widows, so the only way for them to survive, and in many cases support their families, is to beg on the streets.
  • alt-text-here
    A local family walks on the street in Weredish village, Pech Valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan on Dec. 21, 2009. Daily life goes on seemingly normal in these areas even though there are a series of U.S. bases along the river valley, the largest of these being Camp Blessing, located near Nangalam at the junction of the Pech river with the Waygal River.
  • alt-text-here
    Soldiers of 3rd Platoon, Gator Company, 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment return fire on insurgents, who use the surrounding mountains to launch daily attacks on the base, at combat outpost, COP, Michigan, Pech Valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan on Jan. 7, 2010. The majority of these attacks happen just before sunset.
  • alt-text-here
    Soldiers of 2nd Platoon, Baker Company, 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment on patrol in the mountains near Lanyial village, Korengal Valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan on Jan. 1, 2010. Because U.S. forces always patrol the same paths in this area, the insurgents have become accustomed to their movements and frequently attack units as they move along these routes.
  • alt-text-here
    Living quarters at U.S. Army outpost Dallas in the Korengal valley, Kunar province, AFganistan on Dec. 31, 2009. Soldiers are stationed here for one or two week periods and are unable to go outside of the tented quarters during this time as the outpost is often attacked.
  • alt-text-here
    Afghanistan National Army, ANA. soldiers prepare to go out on patrol in the Korengal Valley, which has also been nicknamed "death valley", in Loy Kolay, Korengal Valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan on Dec. 29, 2009. Its unyielding terrain and border with the semi-autonomous Pakistani North-West Frontier Province provides significant advantages for unconventional warfare and militant groups. The province is informally known as "Enemy Central" by American and Western armed forces serving in Afghanistan. In 2009, approximately 60 percent of all insurgent incidents in the country occurred in the province of Kunar.
  • alt-text-here
    Soldiers of 2nd Platoon, Baker Company, 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment return fire after they were attacked by insurgents during an operation in Loy Kalay village in the Korengal Valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan on Dec. 29, 2009. The green smoke is used to camouflage and protect the soldiers from enemy fire. Patrols in this region come under daily attack from Taliban fighters and local insurgents.
  • alt-text-here
    Village leaders gather together during a "Shura", or meeting, between the U.S. army and local civilians in the Korengal Valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan on Dec. 24, 2009. These leaders are all former Mujahideen who fought iduring the Soviet occupation in the 1970s.
  • alt-text-here
    Men on horses play buzkashi in Kabul, Afghanistan on Dec. 11, 2009. Buzkashi, played on horseback, is Afghanistan's national sport. The steppes people were skilled riders who could grab a goat or calf from the ground while riding a horse at full gallop. The goal of a player is to grab the carcass and then get it clear of the other players and pitch it across a goal line or into a target circle or vat. Competition is typically fierce, as other players may use any force short of tripping the horse in order to thwart scoring attempts. The ancient game has been played in northern Afghanistan since the days of Ghengis Khan, the Mongol warrior whose army swept across Asia in the 13th century.
  • alt-text-here
    Snow blankets the mountains of Kabul Afghanistan on Jan. 29, 2010. This winter was one of the driest. In March, the war in Afghanistan will surpass the Vietnam War to become the longest conflict in U.S. history. Afghans continue to face an extremely poor quality of life in the war-torn country. Under the daily threat of U.S. air strikes and fighting between the Taliban and the International Security Assistance Force, ISAF, 80 percent of Afghans live without electricity and many are without potable water. The state of medical care is grim with drug use, along with opium production, and corruption increasing.
  • alt-text-here
    Libyan rebels on the outskirts of Ajdabya eastern Libya, Sunday, March 20, 2011. where now is the new front line .
Download
privacy terms conditions - copyright © 2016 - VII photo agency, llc. all rights reserved the VII logo is a registered trademark, registered in the u.s. patent and trademark offices design by De.MO.org