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ALEXANDRA BOULAT

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    Alexander Boulat stands in one of her photographs, of Arkan's Tigers Photographer: Unknown
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    Polluted sky over Baghdad by oil smoke during the three-week coalition air strikes over the city, Iraq, Feb. 15, 2003. Iraqis started oil fires in and around the city, as a desperate attempt to blind fighter jets and fool guided missiles. A medieval defense technique against 21st century high-tech weaponery. Photo by: Alexandra Boulat / VII
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    MM7098_0073 Iraq, Baghdad war and after. March through Avril 2003 National Geographic Magazine Sept. 2003. PH: Alexandra Boulat/VII March 25 The Storm Behind the Calm The bombing has slowed a bit, probably because of the sandstorm thatÕs stifled Baghdad for the past two days, blanketing the city in an ominous red glow and lulling its residents into a strange lethargy. People canÕt remember anything like it in their lifetimes. Men with guns wander around in the haze, saying the storm is a gift from God because it is thwarting the U.S. troopsÕ advance on the city. ItÕs bizarre because this dusty, oppressive weather is exactly the kind people usually hate, yet now everyone embraces it. They keep hoping the storm will never end.
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    Two Iraqi women mourn in the wash room of the a Shi'ite mosque's funerarium the death of a young girl killed during coalition bombings over Baghdad. The Koranic verse written on the wall reads: ÒTell them (God speaking to prophet Mohammad) that the death you are trying to escape will always catch up with you. You will then return to God -the one who knows about the unknown, about the past and about what is happening. He will ask you about your past life and all your acts." March 29. Photo: Alexandra Boulat
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    A young Iraqi girl lays, packed in a white sheet, on the marble table of the wash room in the a Shi'ite mosque's funerarium after she was killed by a bomb blast during coalition bombings over Baghdad. March 29. Photo: Alexandra Boulat
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    Mullah Omar residence in Kandahar destroyed by air bombardment during the US campaign over Afghanistan, after Al Qaeda's Sept.11 attacks in America. December 2001 Photo: Alexandra Boulat
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    Ashoura celebrations. Shiite Imams gather inside the shrine of Kerbala, praying loud with microphone during the celebrations of the 40th day of Muharram, commemorating the martyrdom of Hussein.
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    Herat, Afghanistan, Presidential Election day. For the first time since 20 years Afghan women are voting to elect the Afghan President. Photo: Alexandra Boulat. October 2004.
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    A young women has burned herself to protest about her condition. She is not willing to tell her story in details, but so far, she complains about her relationship with her step mother. She is currently being treated at the Herat Hospital in the burned department, suffering of deep burns and a begining of septicaemia. Her mother is gently tryieng to feed her, as the doctors do not have much hope for the recovery of this patient. Shahima, 25, set herself on fire twenty days ago. She has just arrived to the hospital but was first healed at her home, in Apushtu Zargham, 25 km away from Herat. " I was unhappy with my husband's family. There was nothing to make me happy in my life. He was nice to me, but his mother and sisters, with whom we live,  punished me all the time."  She has been married for 3 years. Her husband was a teacher but quit his job because his salary wasn't enough to sustain the family. Shahima's family was in exile in Iran for a long time. It's when she went back to Afghanistan that she married. She is a mother of two and denies having set herself on fire although according to the doctors, there is no doubt about that. In the end she'll admit she was feeling very depressed the day this took place, " It's because of all these problems with my family in law...Anyway, I have to go back to my husband." October 2004. Herat Afghanist
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    An Afghan women, suffering from depression, in her room at a shelter in Herat, Afghanistan, October 2004. The shelter, run by the humanitarian organization WASSA, provides accommodation and protection for 20 women who, in most cases, have fled their homes to escape domestic violence. Photo by: Alexandra Boulat / VII
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    An Afghan family who has abandonned it's village because of the draught, has just arrived in Herat Marsak camp, seeking for humanitarian aid. 30000 IDP (displaced people) are leaving in miserable conditions in a camp, few kilometers away from Herat city, Western Afghanistan. Because of the draught, and the war raging on several fronts in Afghanistan, one million people are facing a humanitarian disaster all over the country. Afghanistan, Herat, Marsak camp. PHOTO : Alexandra Boulat. 15/02/2001. AB00030001.
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    Preparations for the funerals of A 8 years old child who died of cold in Herat Marsak refugee camp. His two uncles are preparing the body before bringing him to the camp cemetery under the eyes of few of his family members. -30000 IDP (displaced people) are leaving in miserable conditions in a camp, few kilometers away from Herat city, Western Afghanistan. Because of the draught, and the war raging on several fronts in Afghanistan, one million people are facing a humanitarian disaster all over the country. 15/02/2001. PH: Alexandra Boulat / VII. AB00030007
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    Shafiqa, 60, mother of 15 children, on her way to Kabul. Shafiqa leaves in Mazar. She suffers of intens stomach pains but none of Mazar-e-Sharif's doctors seem to be able to treat her. Therefore, she is going to Kabul's Hospital by plane, accompanied by one of her son, with the hope to get a better diagnose and a recieve the proper treatment. Here, Shafiqa, in pain, gets off the plane in Kabul airport. Photo: Alexandra Boulat. Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan. September 2004.
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    A collection of gun bullets and a paper tulip decorating an office in Quetta, Pakistan. 12/01. NEG PH: Alexandra Boulat / VII AB00090014
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    Thousands of Shiite Women attend the Friday prayer at the Imam Reza mosque in Mashhad, on last Friday before 2004 Ramadan. Photo: Alexandra Boulat. Mashhad, Iran. October 2004.
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    Heading to a wedding party in Kabul, women of all ages get in a car, displaying different fashion styles: At left, a burka coverings dark blue pants follows a fancy dress worn by a 30 year old. No burka and even more style for the young adults at right, and a pink lace dress on a five-year-old girl.
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    Womens Police Academy in Tehran, Iran.
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    Women's day in Mazar-e-Sharif's Hazrat Ali shrine. Photo: Alexandra Boulat. September 2004.
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    Modern Life in Amman, Jordan in February 2006.
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    400 female students attends the Theological school of Mashad. It's the first time that the school open it's door to a photographer. The school was created 30 years ago, and it was closed down for 3 years by the authorities before the Islamic revolution, as it was considered to be too radical. Now, this school is considered as one of the best in Iran. Students are praying before lunch. Mashad, Iran. October 2004
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    At one of Tehran government's women well being center, a refuge for single women or women who has social problems. Mrs Eftekhari, deputy at the Iranian Parliement wearing the Islamic Chador, is visiting the refuge, invited there for an Iftar party, during the holy month of Ramadan. October 2004, Tehran, Iran
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    Bank pyramid's collapse. Bankrupt Albanian's took over the Army baracks and ruled the country for few weeks long.
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    Ethnic Albanian Kosovar girls celebrate freedom in front of a burning house. NATO troops had just liberated Kosovo. The house in the background belonged to a Serb family. As an act of revenge, Albanians looted and burnt it. This is on the road from Mitrovica to Pristina.
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    Two young brides gather for a 3 day long mass wedding ceremony in the Berber village of Taaraart, Morocco, in which 18 couples will be married, Sep. 2003. On the third day of the wedding, brides covered with traditional wool blankets and red veils go to the river together to get some water as a purification ritual. Few men manage to choose women outside their village, however, the families concerned normally agree on pairings that are not in the same family. Photo by: Alexandra Boulat / VII Marocco: Berbers of the High Atlas, two brides at home during the Mass wedding ceremonies, 3 days long to marry 18 couple, by the Ait Ayach people in Taaraart. September 2003. On the third day of the wedding, brides covered with traditional wool blankets an a red viel go to the river together to get some water, as a purification ritual. Taarart village, 2000 inhabitants, in the Djebel Ayachi range, East of the High Atlas. After the harvest, not every year, but when ever it has enough couple to marry, Taarart gets organized for 3 days party to marry its couple. One could see it as inbreeding weddings, but at some point, few men manage to choose women outside their village (they marry them in Taarart), and for the one who choose their life partners inside the village, the families concerned managed to agree for weedings which are not relatives inside the same family. Those wedding customs are tribal and ancient Berber tribal custom, with a muslim/Arabic culture influence. Photo © Alexandra Boulat
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    Bitter over decades of exploitation by Jakarta, Irian Jaya's mostly Christian native people gathered last spring in Jayapura for the second papoua Congress. Declaring Indonesia's claims to their land illegitimate they vowed a continuing struggle for freedom and recognition. INDONESIA, 2000. Photo: Alexandra Boulat / VII AB00040042
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    INDONESIA : LIVING DANGEROUSLY 01 - In Aman LaoLao's Uma, Mentawai Island, West of Sumatra. Deep in the Siberut National Park (UNESCO site), Shaman Aman LaoLao, chef of his clan, is the master of ceremony for the initiation of two new Shamans : his son Aman Telephon (about 22) and Aman Teo Jaja, an older man (about 55). About 50 guests (8 families, 8 Shamans) from 6 different clans attended the ceremonies which lasted for three days and ended with a full night dancing and getting into trances until the rise of the sun. © 2000 Alexandra Boulat / Cosmos
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    Smoke from roasting pigs and sweet potatoes fills the air as the Yali people of highland Irian Jaya prepare a feast in the late morning light, in Indonesia. Photo by: Alexandra Boulat / VII
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    A man sales a dead Paradise bird, endengered spices, on the side of the road for $150. Freeport gold mine. Irian Jaya. Timika. Indonesia, 2000. Photo: Alexandra Boulat / VII AB00040055
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    INDONESIA : LIVING DANGEROUSLY 02 - East of Bali, aerial photograph of sea weed plantations in between Nusa Lembongan island and Nusa Ceningan island, few kilometers East of Bali. The crops, used in the comestic industry, can go for a significantly better price than the rice. © 2000 Alexandra Boulat / Cosmos
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    Women collect dry wood from the desert-like river basin of the Timika River in Timika, Irian Jaya, Indonesia. Though the Timika River was once very large, it disappeared under the acidic runoff from mining tailings produced by the British and American Freeport Company's activities upstream at the largest gold and copper mine in the world. Thirty years before, a dense virgin forest grew along the riverbank, but that has been replaced by a large, gray desert sprawling across thousands of square kilometers. Photo by: Alexandra Boulat / VII
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    A man wearing a typical Muslim-Indonesia hat eats lunch in a small restaurant in the small port of Larantuka, Indonesia, northeast of Flores, after arriving from a neighboring island on a crowded boat. The mural on the wall depicts the diverse Indonesian wildlife. Photo by: Alexandra Boulat / VII
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    Two young Balinese men wait in their car while a Hindu procession passes by carrying offerings of fruit and flowers to a nearby temple in Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia. Though nearly all Balinese are Hindu, only about 2 percent of Indonesians nationwide are members of the religion. Photo by: Alexandra Boulat / VII
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    Yves Saint Laurent having lunch at home in Paris, the day before his last haute couture show in Georges Pompidou Centre, Jan. 21, 2002. The show marked the retirement of Yves Saint Laurent after 40 years of designing haute couture for the rich and famous. Photo by: Alexandra Boulat / VII
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    Yves Saint Laurent judges one of the canvas he designed for his last haute couture show inside his parisian studio, Jan. 17, 2002. The show at Georges Pompidou Centre on Jan. 22, 2002 which featured 200 of his best creations since 1962, marked the retirement of Yves Saint Laurent after 40 years of designing haute couture for the rich and famous. Photo by: Alexandra Boulat / VII
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    Yves Saint Laurent, and his dog Mudjik, working on his last collection at his parisian studio, Jan. 17, 2002. The show at Georges Pompidou Centre on Jan. 22, 2002 which featured 200 of his best creations since 1962, marked the retirement of Yves Saint Laurent after 40 years of designing haute couture for the rich and famous. Photo by: Alexandra Boulat / VII
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    Fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent backstage at the Georges Pompidou Centre after his last haute couture show in Paris, Jan. 22, 2002. The show marked the retirement of Yves Saint Laurent after 40 years of designing haute couture for the rich and famous. Photo by: Alexandra Boulat / VII
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